Corgi AA33318 Boeing B17-G Flying Fortress - Flak Eater 364th BS US Eighth Air Force August 1944 - Chester Model Centre

Corgi AA33318 Boeing B17-G Flying Fortress - Flak Eater 364th BS US Eighth Air Force August 1944

AA33318

Corgi

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Corgi AA33318 Boeing B17-G Flying Fortress - Flak Eater 364th BS US Eighth Air Force August 1944

From the perspective of a Luftwaffe fighter pilot, the sight of hundreds of American Flying Fortresses in formation and heading towards them must have been magnificent and terrifying in equal measure. As the Allies pressed home their increasing aerial supremacy throughout 1944, not only would the Luftwaffe have to contend with a wall of defensive fire from the tightly packed bomber formations, they also knew that their protective fighter cover would be on them both before and after they made their almost suicidal attack run. The latest and definitive 'G' variant of the B-17 introduced the electrically operated Bendix chin turret, which had been developed to combat the frontal attacks preferred by Luftwaffe fighter pilots against earlier models and further increased the defensive firepower of these heavily armed bombers. Chelveston based B-17G 'Flak Eater' of the USAAF 364th Bombardment Squadron certainly wanted any attacking fighter to know that she was equipped with the new nose armament and sported distinctive 'shark mouth' artwork to act as a visual deterrent to any enemy pilot looking for a potential target. Despite the frantic nature of the European air war around the time of D-Day, the decision to apply the turret teeth was vindicated, as they helped 'Flak Eater' through at least 28 combat missions and to survive the war relatively unscathed. The bomber returned to the US in June 1945, where she was later scrapped at Kingman Army Airfield in Arizona, a fate which awaited the majority of aircraft which had fought so valiantly during WWII.

 

Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress

Designed to meet a US Army Air Corps requirement for a multi-engined bomber to replace the B-10, the B-17 first flew on July 18, 1935. Best known for its role in the US Army Air Forces' daylight strategic bombing campaign during World War II, the B-17 could fly high and had a long range, and was capable of defending itself from enemy fighters. It was also tough, withstanding extensive battle damage, and was capable of carrying a 6,000 lb bombload. The B-17 became one of the symbols of Allied air power, equipping 32 overseas combat groups and dropping a total of 580,631 metric tons of bombs on European targets.

Corgi's 1:72 scale B-17 series includes the early war B-17E and late war B-17F and B-17G variants. Corgi's WWII heavy bombers are some of the most sought after diecast models available in 1:72 scale. True to the "Flying Fortress" name, the model is bristling with M2 Browning .50 caliber machine guns, including those found on the rotating top and bottom ball turrets. Detail of the massive Wright R-1820-97 "Cyclone" engines can be spied inside the cowlings while supercharger detail is clearly visible on the underside of each engine nacelle. The wings feature deployable flaps and simulated die-icing boots on the leading edges while the bomb-bay doors are hinged to reveal an ordnance load of eight 500 lb bombs. The mold comprises a large number of diecast components including the fuselage, wings and empennage and includes a heavily constructed all metal display-stand to support this massive aircraft for in-flight display.


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